Theatre

Theatre has always been daring and provocative: for hundreds of years it has brought new ideas to audiences, challenged the status quo, and redefined personal, artistic and social boundaries.

Luke Redmond has been writing theatre for twenty years and directing for ten. A few of his plays are featured below, along with a detailed account of his directing experience.

‘Redmond’s direction is deft with a human touch.’ THE STAGE

‘Writer and Director Luke Redmond sustains the odd, taut atmosphere beautifully … the indications of his talent are everywhere apparent.’
TIME OUT

Vernon and I
Written by Luke Redmond

Vernon and I is the true story of Vernon and Irene Castle, the parents of modern ballroom dancing. Punctuated by public adoration and private tragedy, love and loss, success in the face of the Great War, this is a story perfectly pitched to the ragtime sound of the era. With the script complete, we are now searching for a musical director to collaborate with. More...

Nevermore
Written and Directed by Luke Redmond

An exploration into human avarice and in particular male jealousy, Nevermore is written in a classical style and takes inspiration from ‘The Raven’ by Edgar Allen Poe. It was produced by RedCard Theatre at the New Wimbledon Studio, London in 2005. More...

The Loop
Written by Luke Redmond

The Loop is a farcical comedy about the lives of four students, all completely different yet cohabiting due to the nature of student accommodation. Written for the London Arts Board, it highlights the dangers of stereotyping and discrimination. More...

DIRECTING CREDITS

Although Luke studied dramatic arts and in particular acting, he became drawn towards direction and this was encouraged and nurtured by his academy. He has since concentrated on working as a director or assistant director as often as he can and wherever there is a powerful text. Each play continues to teach him more about the art; here he shares his experiences. More...

REVIEWS

RedCard Theatre was founded by Luke Redmond and James Card in 1998. With a production rate of about one show every five years, it’s clearly been about quality over quantity... Lucky the critics have thought so too. More...